Posted: 11/18/2003

 

Word of Honor

(2003)

by Clint Fletcher



Word Of Honor will premiere on TNT Saturday, Dec. 6, at 8 p.m. (ET/PT) with a special encore on Sunday, Dec. 7, at 8 p.m. (ET/PT).


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Don Johnson (Miami Vice, Nash Bridges) stars as Ben Tyson, a former Lieutenant of the U.S. Army who has retired from duty and runs his own medical practice. A man that once served under his command during Vietnam (John Heard) has recently come forward with allegations that Tyson and the rest of his platoon slaughtered innocent civilians in a hospital out of anger that doctors refused to save one of his men. This incident includes the death of many women and children. Yes… its time for another military court battle.

The story pits the honor of one man on the line simply because he wants to keep the oath made to his soldiers many years ago. Tyson promised his men that no matter what the cost, he would not speak to anyone about what really happened that day in the hospital. A young and determined Army Major (Jeanne Tripplehorn) is brought in to determine the truth by investigating from both sides of the perspective, both the defense and the prosecution… then later taking the position of prosecutor herself. Tyson and his men reunite and come up with a game plan. What really happened that day in the hospital? Will Tyson be charged with murder? Will this be another routine military drama bringing nothing new or fresh to the table?

Don Johnson gives the performance of his career in this intense and somewhat disturbing drama. Word of Honor definitely has something unique going for it: the protagonist is not a nice guy. Johnson’s performance adds a very unsettling aspect to the story as well as giving a truly gripping and emotional finale for his character. The battle sequences are superbly executed by veteran TV director Robert Markowitz (The Tuskegee Airmen). However, as all court cases go these days… nothing is as it seems. You have my word of honor, this film is worth a look… maybe even a second.

Clint Fletcher is a freelance writer living in Chicago.



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