Posted: 04/24/2009

 

Intelligence, Season 2

by Del Harvey




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Intelligence, Season 2 has just been released on DVD and it’s great.

Intelligence authorities on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border are eager to nab Jimmy Reardon (Ian Tracey), a Vancouver drug kingpin - and secret informant to Mary Spalding (Klea Scott), director of the city’s Organized Crime Unit. While Reardon works to hold on to his empire, Spalding works to protect her inside man while steadily trying to advance her own career in the gripping second season of this intriguingly complex crime drama.

The action takes place in Vancouver, where caught drug runners tend to negotiate and compromise rather than go the distance. Season 2, which originally aired in late 2007 on CBC Television, stretches the boundaries of mainstream television somewhat as we discover that some of the bad guys use the “F” word, which is new since the first season.

The second season picks up with drug kingpin Jimmy Reardon (Ian Tracey) barely escaping a Seattle hit organized by a group of American drug agents. On the run, Jimmy sticks to his own nightclub as he tries to juggle his newly-limited informant role for Mary (Klea Scott), former head of the Organized Crime Unit and recently promoted to a new position at the Secret Intelligence Service, with an invasion by American drug dealers. Everyone’s motives are suspect and Mary’s job is threatened from by her subordinates (including Matt Frewer), and also from Ottawa by sinister government ministers. Meanwhile, the FBI and the CIA are hounding her for progress. And to muddy the waters even more, there’s a group of international financiers who are plotting to steal Canada’s water and send it to Mexico.

Jimmy remains true to character, talking tough but preferring to step back when the guns appear. But the narrative is paced briskly enough that characters and their plotlines keep the show moving at a heady clip, even though overt violence is kept to a minimum. Intelligence is similar to a number of contemporary American crime dramas, and even more fun because it’s fresh and new to our eyes. Intelligence, Season 2 is a must for anyone who enjoys a good, fast-paced crime drama. And this set includes 12 episodes, about 45 minutes each, plus the usual extras.

Del Harvey is the founder of Film Monthly, a film teacher, a writer and a film critic in Chicago.



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