Posted: 10/23/2011

 

Anuvahood

by Elaine Hegwood Bowen




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Anuvahood is a comedy, situated on the streets of London, with the ringleader of the neighborhood gang, Kenneth, really wishing he was a gangster, since his Hip-Hop career didn’t take off as well as it should.

With his motley crew in tow, K, as Kenneth is known outside of his household, tries his hand at a little drug dealing, chica chasing and gang culture. The resident bully Tyrone, who has blond and black hair, and wears his pants way down his butt, is upset and exacts his own measure of justice on the guys who think they might be able to wiggle their way into Tyrone’s dope territory. K is a wannabe badboy who has lost his job and the respect of his parents. Well, maybe not his father, because his father builds model planes all day, while his mother worries about the furniture being repossessed.

Anuvahood, while following the neighborhood slackers, is what I say is an ode to Ice Cube’s Friday franchise and to gangster movies, such as Scarface. The characters are far-fetched at first glance, but I suppose they depict what is really out there on the streets, when young men live aimlessly and look for ways to scheme and pick up girls, with no “cash, no whip (car) and no ambition.”

At least in K’s case, he did have a job at the grocery store, but he quit one day in anger, which also mimics what happens in society when you have uneducated young men who can’t take direction and feel it’s better to have no job than to have one where the boss is constantly in your butt.

Ok, I digress, I sort of liked Anuvahood, because it was funny. If I just watched it for the laugh factor, it was a decent movie. But the plot of K trying to pretend to be a drug dealer, by selling drugs only to have Tyrone come and steal the money, while harassing the rest of the crew, is a story that I’ve seen over and over in movies.

Tyrone basically plays the bad guy, previously played by Tom Lister in the Friday franchise. There is even a scene were K gets beat up and his buddy TJ, played by Jazzie Zonzolo hovers over him, reminding him of just how much pain he sustained—the same as in one of the Friday movies. In the end K learns that crime doesn’t pay, and the neighborhood is poised to be a better place because of this hard lesson.

Kenneth is played by Adam Deacon, who also wrote the movie, who has also written another movie called Kidulthood. I give Deacon credit; it’s an entertaining movie with a certain demographic, with a strong cast of British talent, including Ollie Barbieri and featuring hot tunes from Tinie Tempah and Dizzee Rascal. Anuvahood is available on DVD October 25 from the Revolver Group.

To see trailer, visit http://www.anuvahoodusa.com/

Elaine Hegwood Bowen is an editor, writer and film critic in Chicago, who also serves as a news editor for FilmMonthly.com.



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