Film Monthly Home
Archives
Wayne Case
Interviews
Steve Anderson
The Rant
Short Takes (Archived)
Small Screen Monthly
Behind the Scenes
New on DVD
The Indies
Horror
Film Noir
Coming Soon
Now Playing
Television
Books on Film
What's Hot at the Movies This Week
Interviews TV

I’ll Bury You Tomorrow…Laid to Rest

Directed by Alan Rowe Kelly

Written by Alan Rowe Kelly

Starring Bill Corry, Katherine O’Sullivan, Jerry Murdock, Kristen Overdurf

Produced by Alan Rowe Kelly, Gary Malick, Tom Cadawas

Rated R

118 minutes

***

The alarming and downright unnerving tale of love, corpses and murder comes together in “I’ll Bury You Tomorrow…Laid to Rest.”

So what we have here is the story of a young woman who works at Beech’s Funeral Home in the sleepy little town of Port Oram. She then starts taking her work home with her.

And no, not to eat.

At least not eat in the conventional sense, anyway…

That’s right—readers of the “Sexy Losers” webcomic will be happy to know that a necrophiliac has once again started working at a mortuary.

Wouldn’t that just be the one thing you would love to have, as the owner of a funeral home? You’re just about to knock off for the day, after a long day of dressing and making up corpses, and selling some coffins to the bereaved or the soon to be bereaved when you figure you’ll go look in on the new hire. Just swing that door right open and say:

“Hey, Dolores…how’s work coming on Mr. Murphyyyyeeeeek!”

And there she is! Your new hire, in flagrante corpses delecti.

Yipes almighty.

Even better, the Beeches think that Dolores, their new hire, looks eerily like their own deceased daughter Sharon.

The thing that really strikes me most about “I’ll Bury You Tomorrow…Laid to Rest” is the sheer number of simultaneous plots going on. We’ve got delinquent brothers, corpse thieves, evil parents, and several others running right alongside our necrophiliac Dolores. Each separate plot manages to meld into this whole that reminds me of “Needful Things,” where several different rivalries played out right along side each other into one whole plot orchestrated by Leland Gaunt.

And man, do they really shoot for authenticity on this one. I’ve never seen this deep and up close an examination of funeral home practices and procedures.

Perhaps my only real objection is the run time. This little fella weighs in at a monstrous two hours, and I can tell you that there are some segments that could have been cut to back this down to a more reasonable ninety to a hundred minutes with little or no loss. And no subtitles make things extra difficult.

It also doesn’t help that the video is of the grainiest possible quality—it looks like it was shot on Super 8 then left on a shelf for a couple months before converted to DVD.

The ending is a real winner, with all of the plots simultaneously coming together in one great big twenty minute rolling train wreck. It really is amazing—an incredible payoff for anyone who actually had the sheer fortitude to follow all the way to the end. Plus, there’s a terribly impressive little twist that shows up—anyone else wonder what’s in the box?

The special features include deleted scenes (deleted scenes?? This thing already ran two hours, and they cut it down to get there??) under the menu “Dead and Buried,” a blooper reel, a photo gallery, and three different trailers for “I’ll Bury You Tomorrow…Laid To Rest.”

All in all, despite grainy video and a far too long run time, “I’ll Bury You Tomorrow…Laid to Rest” is a pretty solid title with lots going on. Perhaps a little too much if you’re on a tight schedule, but those with the time and the patience to enjoy the proceedings ought to get a kick out of what’s going on here.

Steve Anderson is a film critic who collects action figures so he can dress them up as his favorite horror villains. He lives somewhere in the United States.


Got a problem? E-mail us at filmmonthly@gmail.com