Posted: 08/10/2004

 

Dead Seven

(2003)

by Barry Meyer



Is your number up? Available here.


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Three sexy coed friends enter the realms of darkness as they follow Harley and his homicidal sister Venus deeper into the forest that they call home. Harley can’t hear or speak so they’re all forced to continue their wicked game of hide and seek, unaware of all the decaying bodies of rival drug dealers lying among the damp, musty earth beneath their feet. When they’ve seen too much, Dawkins, a nasty powerful meth dealer, hurls Harley into a dark bottomless mine shaft, and leaves him to die. Before he knows it, one by one, the witnesses start showing up dead, brutally murdered by an unseen force. Could Harley be back, or is Dawkins driving his girlfriend Julie insane with his paranoia? All he knows is the body count keeps rising and he’s not sure who to trust in this wicked tale of revenge and the occult. Is his number up?

It’s really tough to review some of these micro-budget horror flicks, because, for the most part, the filmmakers are really trying to do something fun. And I’ll give them credit for trying. But, like many of these indie horror flicks, Dead Seven suffers at the hands of an inexperienced fanboy filmmaker, who seems more intent on making cool splatter gore FX than making a complete movie. The story takes a back seat to the gore, the actors all look as if they’ve read their lines just before the camera rolled — and the camera work itself! Note to director - buy a tripod. Nothing is more annoying that watching an entire flick filmed with a handheld cheap video cam - with the only source of audio mounted atop of it. These guys didn’t totally bone this movie. There’s some good gore, but they’d fare much better the next time around by doing some heavy planning.

Barry Meyer is a writer sweating it out in Jersey.



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