Sengoku Basara: Samurai Kings Season 2

| March 8, 2012 | 0 Comments

Sengoku Basara: Samurai Kings 2 continues the fine tradition that season one set up of delivering non-stop thrills and action that knows no bounds. Taking place shortly after season one, all of the gererals go back to fighting one another, until another major threat looms its head. Hideyoshi Toyotomi has amassed a giant army to conquer all of Japan under his rule. This is only the first step to his ultimate plan of taking over the world, with sword and steel. Its up to the likes of Sanada Yukimura, Masamune Date and all of the other generals to take care of Toyotomi, before its too late. While there are not as many fights in this series as the first, Samurai Kings 2′s scope widens to tell a very epic story that no anime fan should miss.

One of the biggest reasons why season two is enhanced over season one is in its main antagonist. Nobunaga was a man of pure evil and gave real reason for the various warlords to take up arms against him. With Toyotomi, there’s a real sense of struggle because he is trying to unify the land in order to make a strong country of Japan. With this in place, many of the allies from the first season become villains, not in the evil sense but men trying to find a way to contribute to what they think is a noble cause. It is this conflict that helps raise the stakes and offers much more to those that have already invested within the world of Sengoku Basara. Characters like Masamune Date and Sanada Yukimura get some time to really show who they are and what shapes them as soldiers in this massive war. While there is much more story going on in comparison to the first season, there’s still plenty of room for these guys to cut loose and kick ass. There’s still giant armies being raised by various generals with crazy powers and ridiculous armor, but that the flair and appeal that this series has going for it.

The video on the Blu-Ray discs of Sengoku Basara: Samurai Kings 2 are encoded in a 1080p, AVC transfer with an aspect ratio of 1.78:1. The HD transfer of Sengoku Basara places their efforts at the forefront and it passes with flying colors. Its just as sharp as the first season and Production I.G. continues their level of quality that they set with season one. The DVD’s that are included look great as well, they’re just presented in standard definition.

Just like the very first season, the audio comes in two versions, the English Dolby TrueHD 5.1 channel and the Japanese Dolby True HD 2.0. The mix of the 5.1 track is extremely impressive with the use of incredible panning and its ability to draw one into the large battle sequences. The 2.0 track was the one I stuck mostly, due to the fact that since the show takes place in ancient Japan, it seemed much more suitable that way.

With a very nice chipboard box set, to contain seasons one and two, there’s a few nice extras on Samurai Kings 2. There are commentaries on episodes 6 and 12 by the English cast and crew and another series of shorts of Mini Sengoku Basara. While the first series of Mini Basara showed Chosokabe and Mori on the sidelines, this one focuses on Date’s right hand man, Katakura. With him focusing on harvesting crops and dealing with various other chibi characters, its a real fun time and funny for all seven episodes. There are also textless intro and outro songs that round out all of the special features in this set.

I loved season one of Sengoku Basara and I was hoping that season two would deliver the goods. Sengoku Basara: Samurai Kings 2 does deliver and continues the fun and excitement from the previous volume. It does a great job at fleshing out many of the characters we’ve met extremely well and gives some slight dramatic weight and dimensions to them. Not only this, but the action and stakes get raised that make Sengoku Basara: Samurai Kings 2 a sequel not to be missed. Highly Recommended!

About the Author:

is a graduate from Columbia College Chicago with a degree in Audio for Visual Media. He works as a freelance location sound mixer, boom operator, sound designer, and writer in his native Chicago. He's an avid collector of films, comics, and anime.
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