Author Archive: Matthew Vasiliauskas

Matthew Vasiliauskas is a graduate of Columbia College Chicago. His work has appeared in publications such as Conjunctions, Berlin’s Sand Literary Journal, The University Of Wyoming’s Owen Wister Review, Chicago Literati and The Pennsylvania Review. Matthew currently lives and works in New York City.

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The Duke Of Burgundy

The Duke Of Burgundy

| January 24, 2015

The limits of desire and fulfillment are dissected quite captivatingly in Peter Strickland’s latest film The Duke Of Burgundy. The story takes place in an unknown town and in the rooms and gardens of a seemingly ancient estate. There, Cynthia, played by Sidse Babett Knudesen, an assumed although never confirmed entomologist engages in a sadomasochistic relationship with […]

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Two Days, One Night

Two Days, One Night

| January 9, 2015

Brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne create a moving and complex portrait of everyday survival with their latest film Two Days, One Night. The story follows Sandra, played by Marion Cotillard, who has just returned to work after suffering a bout of depression.  As soon as she arrives though, management reveals they can operate with one […]

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Venus In Fur

Venus In Fur

| June 20, 2014

The role of submission, in both its physical and emotional manifestations, and its potential place in romantic relationships is explored compellingly in Roman Polanski’s latest film Venus In Fur. Based on the Tony Award-winning Broadway play by David Ives, which itself was based on Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s novella, the film follows writer/director Thomas (Mathieu Amalric) […]

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Korengal

Korengal

| June 6, 2014

In 1879, with War and Peace and Anna Karenina behind him, author Leo Tolstoy began suffering a spiritual and existential crisis. Like so many before and after him, he began questioning the meaning of his life and the seemingly contradictory components of existence in general. Chronicling this struggle in his book A Confession, Tolstoy wrote, […]

Like Father, Like Son

Like Father, Like Son

| January 17, 2014

The complicated significance of blood connections is compellingly presented in director Kore-eda Hirokazu’s latest effort Like Father, Like Son. The film follows Ryota (played by Fukuyama Masaharu), a successful businessman whose constant striving for excellence dominates every motivation of his life, particularly in his household where the academic expectations for his son Keita have grown […]

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Blue Is The Warmest Color

Blue Is The Warmest Color

| October 26, 2013

The struggles between the physical and mental aspects of romantic desire are intensely deconstructed in director Abdellatif Kechiche’s latest film, Blue Is The Warmest Color. Loosely based on Julie Maroh’s graphic novel Le bleu est une couleur chaude, the story centers on a 15-year old girl named Adele (played by Adele Exarchopoulos) who is climbing into […]

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The Hunt

The Hunt

| July 12, 2013

Neurologist Oliver Sacks once said, “Every act of perception, is to some degree an act of creation, and every act of memory is to some degree an act of imagination.” Perception and the malleability of memory are key components in director Thomas Vinterberg’s latest film The Hunt. The story follows Lucas (played by Mads Mikkelsen), a […]

Something In The Air

Something In The Air

| May 5, 2013

In George Orwell’s Homage To Catalonia, his 1938 novel detailing his personal experiences in the Spanish Civil War, the author memorably wrote that bombs were impartial and that, “they killed the men they were thrown at, and the men who threw them.” This grayness permeating through the cracks and crevices of political frustration creates a […]

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Room 237

Room 237

| April 10, 2013

Few films have provoked audiences to a degree of obsessive debate as much as Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror classic The Shining, and in the new documentary Room 237, director Rodney Ascher examines the iconic film and the seemingly infinite possibilities as to its true meaning. With the participation of 5 interviewees including a veteran ABC […]

Blancanieves

Blancanieves

| April 1, 2013

In his seminal book on bullfighting Death In The Afternoon, Ernest Hemingway saw the act not as some sort of senseless barbaric sport but as a true art form akin to ballet or painting, but one that is fleeting and described it as, “an impermanent art as singing and dance are, one of those that […]

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