Author Archive: Matthew Vasiliauskas

Matthew Vasiliauskas is a graduate of Columbia College Chicago. His work has appeared in publications such as Conjunctions, Berlin’s Sand Literary Journal, The University Of Wyoming’s Owen Wister Review, Chicago Literati and The Pennsylvania Review. Matthew currently lives and works in New York City.

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Disorder

Disorder

| August 12, 2016

Reality, and how trauma influences an individual’s sense of it, is at the heart of director Alice Winocour’s latest feature Disorder. The story follows Vincent (Matthias Schoenaerts), a French Special Forces soldier who has just returned from Afghanistan. Suffering from PTSD, Vincent tries to stay as busy as possible, picking up the odd security job to […]

Don’t Blink: An Interview With Laura Israel

Don’t Blink: An Interview With Laura Israel

| July 11, 2016

In Jack Kerouac’s classic 1957 novel On The Road, the author says, “What is that feeling when you’re driving away from people and they recede on the plain till you see their specks dispersing? It’s the too huge world vaulting us, and it’s goodbye. But we lean forward to the next crazy venture beneath the […]

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Presenting Princess Shaw

Presenting Princess Shaw

| June 1, 2016

For some time now, the internet has been challenging our perceptions of what art can be, and in Ido Haar’s documentary Presenting Princess Shaw, the idea of online applications as the next evolution in artistic instrumentation is explored quite thoughtfully. The story follows Samantha Montgomery, a care-giver working and living in one of the toughest neighborhoods […]

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An Interview with D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus

An Interview with D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus

| May 26, 2016

Can a river be a person? Should a 180 mile waterway, traversing the slopes of an active volcano, lined by scenic flour mills and home to 18 species of fish be granted the same legal rights as a human being? The New Zealand government thought so when it granted the Whanganui River personhood status in 2012. […]

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An interview with director Terence Davies

An interview with director Terence Davies

| May 12, 2016

With his latest film Sunset Song, director Terence Davies examines the limits of human endurance, and the struggles in maintaining and supporting treasured traditions in the face of often harsh evolutions in modern society. Based on the classic novel by Lewis Grassic Gibbon, the story takes place in rural Scotland at the turn of the […]

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Louder Than Bombs

Louder Than Bombs

| April 7, 2016

In James Baldwin’s book The Devil Finds Work, the author states, “It is said that the camera cannot lie, but rarely do we allow it to do anything else, since the camera sees what you point it at: the camera sees what you want it to see. The language of the camera is the language […]

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The Wonders

The Wonders

| October 30, 2015

Life can begin with a sting. Although the barbs of a bee’s stinger often produce pain and a potentially debilitating poison, a toxin within the venom called melitten has been shown to poke holes in the protective shells of many viruses, including HIV. The idea of life surfacing out of dire emotional and physical circumstances […]

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Phoenix

Phoenix

| August 4, 2015

The impermanence of identity becomes the primary focus of director Christian Petzold’s latest film Phoenix. The story takes place in Berlin in 1945 and follows Nelly (Nina Hoss), a German-Jewish ex-nightclub singer who has survived being interned at a Nazi concentration camp. With her face disfigured from a bullet wound, Nelly undergoes reconstructive surgery, emerging […]

The Look Of Silence

The Look Of Silence

| July 23, 2015

There is gold in blood. 0.2 milligrams coursing through capillaries and vascular muscle, the minerals meandering in the crevices separating organs and connective tissue. If the current market value puts 1oz of gold at $1,132.30, and we were to extract and melt down the gold from our bodies, we would get $0.01, an amount valuable […]

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White God

White God

| March 31, 2015

Government discrimination and the battle over societal rights are taken to the extreme in director Kornel Mundruczó’s latest film White God. The story follows 13 year old Lili (Zsofia Psotta) and her dog Hagen. Upon accepting a professorship in Australia, Lili’s mother sends her and Hagen to live with Lili’s father Daniel (Sandor Zsoter) in Budapest. After accusations […]