Author Archive: Jason Coffman

Jason Coffman

Jason Coffman is a film writer living in Chicago. He writes reviews for Film Monthly and is a regular contributor to Fine Print Magazine (www.fineprintmag.net).

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Blood Bath

Blood Bath

| June 3, 2016

Arrow Video has been building their reputation as the “Criterion of cult” for years now, giving lavish home video editions to films that have languished in a limbo of bare-bones releases (and some that never had releases at all). Their latest set, however, is in a class of its own. Exploitation cinema legend Roger Corman’s […]

Killer Dames: Two Gothic Chillers by Emilio P. Miraglia

Killer Dames: Two Gothic Chillers by Emilio P. Miraglia

| May 27, 2016

Arrow Video has been one of premiere home video imprints for genre cinema for some time now, and since their launch in the States they have been maintaining that reputation with a fantastic slate of releases. One of the recent highlights for horror and giallo fans was their Blu-ray/DVD set of Luciano Ercoli’s “Death Walks” […]

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The Boy

The Boy

| May 10, 2016

2016 has been a big year for prosaic horror film titles. The Forest, The Witch, The Other Side of the Door, and The Darkness will all have seen release before half the year is over. Other than The Witch, all of these films are (or in the case of the as yet unreleased The Darkness, […]

Scherzo Diabolico

Scherzo Diabolico

| May 6, 2016

Adrián García Bogliano made a big impression on horror fans with his first English-language feature Late Phases, which was also a pretty big departure for the filmmaker in other ways. He didn’t write the screenplay, and the subject matter–a blind veteran taking on a werewolf terrorizing a retirement community–couldn’t have been more different from most […]

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Magical Girl

Magical Girl

| April 22, 2016

Noir can take many different forms, and even if on first glance Carlos Vermut’s Magical Girl does not seem to fit the bill, a little digging reveals its roots. Vermut’s debut feature Diamond Flash has never seen a stateside release, but this follow-up made big waves at film festivals all over the world including some […]

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The Lady in the Car with Glasses and a Gun

The Lady in the Car with Glasses and a Gun

| April 15, 2016

Occasionally a film comes along that feels almost like a parody of itself or its genre, and it takes a little digging to figure out if that is indeed the case. Take The Lady in the Car with Glasses and a Gun, for example. It’s an adaptation of a popular French novel that has previously […]

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Death Walks Twice: Two Films by Luciano Ercoli

Death Walks Twice: Two Films by Luciano Ercoli

| April 8, 2016

Giallo, that peculiarly Italian strain of mystery and horror that flourished in the 1960s and 1970s, has seen a huge resurgence in popularity among cult films fans over the last decade. DVD helped bring many of the best of these films to audiences in the States who may have never had a chance to see […]

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My Science Project

My Science Project

| February 19, 2016

Nostalgia is a hell of a thing, and a number of home video imprints have been recently reissuing some very unexpected titles on Blu-ray to capitalize on it. This is, for the most part, an almost unmitigated good: the more obscure, oddball films that are available in physical formats, the better. Predictably, not every one […]

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Serial Kaller

Serial Kaller

| January 28, 2016

Before Serial Kaller even starts, it helpfully gives viewers a warning. The logo for Loaded Film, one of the production companies who made the film, includes the slogan “for men who should know better.” If you feel like that applies to you, heed the warning: you should know better than to sit through another low-budget […]

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Cherry Tree

Cherry Tree

| January 8, 2016

One of Hammer Films’s first productions after its 2000s resurrection was David Keating’s Wake Wood, a tale of grieving parents who make a bargain to bring their daughter back to life. It was fairly well-received, but did not receive much attention here in the States. Keating makes a return to British occult horror with his […]

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