Author Archive: Jason Coffman

Jason Coffman

Jason Coffman is a film writer living in Chicago. He writes reviews for Film Monthly and is a regular contributor to Fine Print Magazine (www.fineprintmag.net).

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Serial Kaller

Serial Kaller

| January 28, 2016

Before Serial Kaller even starts, it helpfully gives viewers a warning. The logo for Loaded Film, one of the production companies who made the film, includes the slogan “for men who should know better.” If you feel like that applies to you, heed the warning: you should know better than to sit through another low-budget […]

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Cherry Tree

Cherry Tree

| January 8, 2016

One of Hammer Films’s first productions after its 2000s resurrection was David Keating’s Wake Wood, a tale of grieving parents who make a bargain to bring their daughter back to life. It was fairly well-received, but did not receive much attention here in the States. Keating makes a return to British occult horror with his […]

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Sinister 2

Sinister 2

| January 8, 2016

Sequels are always a tricky thing to get right, and horror sequels have their own unique demands. Stray too far from the things that made the first film a success and people will be confused; stick too close to formula and they might get bored. It’s a tough balancing act that only gets more difficult […]

Artsploitation Films 2015 Update

Artsploitation Films 2015 Update

| January 6, 2016

Artsploitation Films returned in 2015 after a hiatus with a strong slate of varied international films. Their stated mission is to distribute “intriguing, unsettling, unpredictable and provocative films from around the world,” and the films they have released since their return have certainly lived up to that standard. We at Film Monthly have covered some […]

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Deathgasm

Deathgasm

| January 5, 2016

New Zealand has a proud history of horror comedies, and in 2014 Gerard Johnstone’s Housebound became a new entry into that country’s canon of fun, inventive genre cinema. In 2015, two more horror comedies made a big impression on the international film scene: Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi’s What We Do in the Shadows and […]

Kill Game

Kill Game

| January 4, 2016

A warning: This is not going to be so much a review of Kill Game as a rant about problems common to many modern horror films in general. So if that’s not what you’re looking for, feel free to move on, thanks for your time, sorry to disappoint. Suffice to say I was not a […]

One Eyed Girl

One Eyed Girl

| December 11, 2015

Low-key psychological horror/thrillers of the 1970s have become a popular touchstone for genre filmmakers over the last few years, resulting in some critically-acclaimed takes on familiar material. The best known of these may be Sean Durkin’s Martha Marcy May Marlene (2011) and Alex Ross Perry’s Queen of Earth (2015), but there have been a number […]

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Mandingo

Mandingo

| December 4, 2015

In the canon of 70s exploitation cinema, there may be no category of films more uncomfortable to watch for modern viewers than “slavesploitation.” Hardly anyone in the audience at a 2015 Fantastic Fest screening of Gualtiero Jacopetti and Franco Prosperi’s notorious “mondo” slavery film Farewell Uncle Tom had seen it before, which was shocking in […]

Children of the Night (aka Limbo)

Children of the Night (aka Limbo)

| November 18, 2015

The vampire, one of cinema’s oldest monsters, is damned hard to make interesting in the twenty-first century. Since the silent film era, legions of filmmakers have tried to present different takes on the vampire mythology, and the monsters have enjoyed a cyclical popularity that most recently took the form of the Twilight phenomenon. That’s not […]

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Deadly Prey (1987) and The Deadliest Prey (2013)

Deadly Prey (1987) and The Deadliest Prey (2013)

| November 17, 2015

To say that David A. Prior’s Deadly Prey is a cult classic is to be guilty of gross understatement. Originally released directly to video in 1987, the film has gathered a passionate cult following who discovered the film on VHS all over the world. This process reached a peak with some theatrical screenings of the […]

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