Author Archive: Jef Burnham

Jef is a writer and educator in Chicago, Illinois. He holds a degree in Media & Cinema Studies from DePaul University, but sometimes he drops it and picks it back up again. He's also the Editor-in-Chief of FilmMonthly.com and is fueled entirely by coffee (as if you couldn't tell).

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Money from Home

Money from Home

| June 26, 2017

Once upon a time, you could go to the theater and see Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis in Technicolor AND 3-D in their 1953 collaboration, Money from Home. A milestone for the team, Money from Home would be Martin and Lewis’ only 3-D film (weird to think about seeing a Martin/Lewis musical in 3-D given […]

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The Unholy: Vestron Video Collector’s Series

The Unholy: Vestron Video Collector’s Series

| June 26, 2017

In a very short time, Lionsgate’s Vestron Video Collector’s Series has made its stamp on the cult films home video market, bringing many beloved films from cult audiences’ VHS rental-filled youths to Blu-ray in editions that are far more impressive than we could have realistically expected. Lionsgate debuted the Vestron Video line of Blu-rays in […]

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Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In: The Complete Series

Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In: The Complete Series

| June 19, 2017

Time Life’s home video release of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In: The Complete Series is one of the most delightfully formidable collections I’ve ever dipped into—a bit of a contradiction, I know, but hopefully you’ll see what I mean soon enough. Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In ran for 140 episodes from 1968 to 1973 and Time Life […]

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Archie’s Weird Mysteries: The Complete Series

Archie’s Weird Mysteries: The Complete Series

| June 13, 2017

If you happen to like both Archie Comics and old B-movies, then the 1999-2000 animated series Archie’s Weird Mysteries is clearly for you. Sure, that’s an oddly specific demographic, but I found myself drawn to it, as I somehow met both these criteria. Admittedly, my interest in Archie Comics did not persist much following my […]

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Madhouse

Madhouse

| June 13, 2017

I can’t possibly begin talking about Ovidio G. Assonitis’ Madhouse without immediately drawing comparisons between the film and J. Lee Thompson’s Happy Birthday to Me. Both films were clearly made to cash in on the slasher horror craze in the immediate post-Friday the 13th years. Both films were released in 1981 in fact (though Madhouse […]

Walt Disney’s Bambi: Anniversary Edition

Walt Disney’s Bambi: Anniversary Edition

| June 5, 2017

Most folks, I imagine, are familiar with Disney Studios’ fifth feature film about the deer Prince Bambi– a coming-of-age story told through a series of alternatingly hilarious and heart-warming vignettes. Released in 1942, it’s a film many of us grew up with. When I was a kid, you either owned it on VHS or could […]

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Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology

Early Women Filmmakers: An International Anthology

| June 1, 2017

Debates over women’s roles in media are being hotly debated right now. Online the animosity is so intense that some women have been scared out of their fields entirely. Why? Because, to some, this or that industry is by definition a boys’ club. No place for women or their perspectives. No place for diversity or […]

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DC Super Hero Girls: Intergalactic Games

DC Super Hero Girls: Intergalactic Games

| May 23, 2017

When the web series/toy line tie-in franchise DC Super Hero Girls made its feature film debut in last year’s straight-to-video DC Super Hero Girls: Hero of the Year, I found in it a children’s film that I could enjoy with my then 4-year-old son who clearly got a lot more out of it than I […]

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Vixen: The Movie

Vixen: The Movie

| May 23, 2017

My relationship with CW’s Arrowverse has been an admittedly tumultuous one. I’ve gone back and forth on Arrow since it debuted, giving up on it entirely somewhere near the end of the first season and then returning following the premiere of The Flash. I’ve found DC’s Legends of Tomorrow to be an incredible lot of […]

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The Climber

The Climber

| May 20, 2017

After completing his work on four Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey between 1970 and 1974 and splitting from Warhol’s “factory” crowd, Joe Dallesandro could have faded into obscurity, being written off as some pretty-boy sex symbol incapable of being taken seriously as a performer. Indeed that could have been the case if he had set […]

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