Posted: 10/14/2004

 

Blue Remains

(2004)

by Keita Browne



This almost direct-to-DVD film, clearly aimed at younger viewers, was directed by Hisaya Takabayashi and Toshifumi Takizawa. Available from ArtsMagicDVD.com.


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Two environmental scientists and their daughter Anamiku are on a mission to revive Earth, which was damaged by nuclear warfare. As they prepare to descend into Earth’s atmosphere they discover that the war is still ongoing. As they enter the atmosphere one of the nuclear explosions impact the ship. The ship becomes contaminated by radiation. Anamiku’s parents are forced to place her in suspended animation to prevent her from becoming infected. As she is placed into the sleep chamber her parents explain that she must take the seeds of life/DNA and revive the Earth to its normal state. Decades after she awakens she discovers a large percentage of the world is covered by water and a villainous brain mastermind who wants to cleanse the Earth and Space of humans.

This film’s concept is very intelligent and the story was well written. Blue Remains is another GAGA production that plays like a video game. The action sequences were awesome and original. The plot was very well introduced and engaging. The only thing I didn’t understand were the beings with very big brains and eyes. Where did they come from? What made him like that? The final scenes of the film include some of the best animation—although, as the commentary (by the excellent Jonathan Clements, co-writer of the Anime Encyclopedia) points out, its symbolic climax arguably reveals the maker’s game design sensibility, rather than the dramatic movement required for film narrative. On a scale of one to ten, Blue Remains is a definite 7.5. It’s very entertaining and it’s a must watch.

Keita Browne is a screenwriter and Anime writer in Chicago.



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