Archive for July, 2011

Good Day for It

Good Day for It

| July 24, 2011

The trouble with genre films is that they can tread such a thin line between wit and cliché. When done well, filmmakers can use genre as a tool for parody, commentary, or honest rendering of the already established conventions. When done poorly, however, these films come off as tired, boring, and formulaic. This brings me […]

×
Casshern Sins: Part I

Casshern Sins: Part I

| July 23, 2011

Casshern Sins is a great mix of old school characters and new school animation that should make anime fans rejoice. The show is remake of the 1973 series Robot Hunter Casshan by Tatsunoku Productions. Tatsunoku enlisted top tier animation studio, Madhouse, to update the series and present one of their classic characters to a new […]

×
Blue Gender

Blue Gender

| July 23, 2011

Blue Gender is a great Sci-Fi anime that packs a punch and delivers on all fronts. The show was created in 1999 by Studio AIC and by Ryousuke Takahashi, the original creator of Armored Troopers Votoms. With this combination of talent, Blue Gender sports a well polished story along with a great sense of visuals […]

×
30 Minutes or Less

30 Minutes or Less

| July 23, 2011

In 2003, Brian Douglas Wells, a high school dropout, pizza deliveryman, and “valued employee” of the Mama Mia Pizzeria, was double-crossed by Marjorie Diehl-Armstrong and Kenneth Barnes, his co-conspirators in a botched robbery plot. On the afternoon of August 28th, at the end of a dirt road, the crooks fastened a time bomb to Wells’ […]

×
Captain America: The First Avenger

Captain America: The First Avenger

| July 23, 2011

Anyone who has gone to high school in the U.S. remembers those lectures about the American Dream, but never has someone mentioned Captain America, a man who epitomizes it. Created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby in 1941, Captain America became the comic-book world’s most nationalistic superhero. And though the serial was meant as a […]

×
Four Weddings and a Funeral

Four Weddings and a Funeral

| July 23, 2011

A young Hugh Grant, periodically sporting a pair of round-rimmed glasses and looking curiously similar to a certain bespectacled young wizard, is the focal point of director’s Mike Newell’s (the man behind Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Prince of Persia) endearing yet forgettable 1994 feature, Four Weddings and a Funeral. The film […]

×
Terri

Terri

| July 23, 2011

Terri is the story of a young man, who is isolated from his classmates but who has a tender heart and caring spirit for his Uncle James, who suffers from dementia and with whom he lives. He doesn’t know his mother or father, and to add to his introverted demeanor is the fact that he […]

Tetsuo: The Bullet Man

Tetsuo: The Bullet Man

| July 22, 2011

Shinya Tsukamoto’s Tetsuo: The Bullet Man is a fine return to the Tetsuo series and a testament to Tsukamoto’s career thus far. The film stars Eric Bossick as Anthony, a business man living in Tokyo, Japan with his wife and son. After the sudden tragedy in the family, caused by The Guy (Shinya Tsukamoto, who […]

×
Bulworth

Bulworth

| July 22, 2011

Bulworth is a very peculiar film. Being the most remembered movie poster of my childhood, I’ve always had a soft spot for the film. Revisiting the movie twelve years after its initial release in 1998, there are moments in the film where I question the boldness of the racial and political satire. Bulworth tells the […]

The Alloy Orchestra Plays Wild and Weird

The Alloy Orchestra Plays Wild and Weird

| July 22, 2011

The “14 Fascinating and Innovative Films” (circa 1902-1965) featured in this collection boast brand new scores composed by The Alloy Orchestra– a unique, three-man ensemble whose music is every bit as wild and weird as the titles collected herein. But that is by no means a bad thing. Often, when one views a silent film, […]

×