Archive for March, 2002

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

| March 8, 2002

Written by David Seltzer and Brandon Camp & Mike Thompson and based on a story by Camp and Thompson, Dragonfly is the latest directorial outing of Tom Shadyac, who has cast the likes of Linda Hunt and Kathy Bates in minor roles and Kevin Costner as the lead. The last half of the previous sentence […]

All About the Benjamins

All About the Benjamins

| March 8, 2002

Ice Cube is still trying to elevate himself from rapper to bit actor to star thespian. Problem is, he doesn’t possess the self-awareness of LL Cool J or the marketing savvy of Ice T. Both of those individuals seem to be in tune enough with their personas, on screen and off, to the point that […]

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The Son’s Room

The Son’s Room

| March 7, 2002

The inevitable comparison has to be addressed, so let’s get that out of the way first. What is the chance that two high-profile films about a family coping with a son’s unexpected death will turn up in any given year? This was the year of both Nanni Moretti’s The Son’s Room and Todd Fields’ In […]

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Ali

Ali

| March 5, 2002

Upon hearing that Will Smith had just been cast as his royal highness of the boxing world, Muhammed Ali, I was understandably skeptical. I am in fact a big Will Smith fan and more so since his move from T.V. to movies. Yet, there was something odd about the casting choice in my mind. Smith […]

Hart’s War

Hart’s War

| March 4, 2002

I am a big Bruce willis fan. I love him in the Die Hards, both the good and the bad. Last Man Standing, Twelve Monkeys, Death Becomes Her, The Last Boy Scout, Billy Bathgate. He has made his fair share of stinkers, too, with Hudson Hawk, North, etc. And now we have this film. In […]

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Storytelling

Storytelling

| March 1, 2002

Todd Solondz’ latest, Storytelling, is a diptych, two short films that can stand alone but when placed next to each other, create additional layers of meaning. The two short films that comprise Storytelling are appropriately entitled “Fiction” and “Non-Fiction.” Sadly, this is about as clever as it gets. Though not his first film, 1995’s Welcome […]

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